Entries in new yorker (3)

Sunday
Sep132015

John Cassidy in the New Yorker

Being more realistic about the role that college degrees play would help families and politicians make better choices. It could also help us appreciate the actual merits of a traditional broad-based education, often called a liberal-arts education, rather than trying to reduce everything to an economic cost-benefit analysis. “To be clear, the idea is not that there will be a big financial payoff to a liberal arts degree,” Cappelli writes. “It is that there is no guarantee of a payoff from very practical, work-based degrees either, yet that is all those degrees promise. For liberal arts, the claim is different and seems more accurate, that it will enrich your life and provide lessons that extend beyond any individual job. There are centuries of experience providing support for that notion.” Click.

Monday
Mar102014

This sentence sure is true

Nicholas Lemann in the new New Yorker: Plucking a few events out of the vastness of the world and declaring them to be the news of the day is a mysterious and complicated project.

Saturday
Dec212013

Nicholas Schmidle in the New Yorker

On the night of January 7, 1610, Galileo Galilei, a resident of Padua, walked onto his balcony and tipped his telescope toward space. Click.